Sorsogon’s List of Governors – 1894 to 1967


This list is from 1894, when Sorsogon separated[1] from Albay, ‘til 1967.

1894-95[2]

Jose de la Guardia

1895-96

Guillermo Montes Salienda Salazar, Marquez de la Vastida

1897-98

Leandro[3] Villamil

1898-99

Celestino Mercarder[4]

1900[5]-01

This was the start of American occupation. The male citizens of age were instructed how to vote. The municipal officials were elected first.  On 1901, Dr. Bernardino Monreal M.D., was the first elected provincial governor of Sorsogon. He served for only a year’s term.

1902-08

Dr. Bernardino Monreal M.D.[6]

Picture of Governo Mario Guarina. Image is via Facts About Sorsogon, Sorsogon Provincial Library.

Picture of Governo Mario Guarina. Image is via Facts About Sorsogon, Sorsogon Provincial Library.

Governor Jose Cervantes. Image via Facts About Sorsogon, Sorsogon Provincial Library.

Governor Jose Zurbito. Image via Facts About Sorsogon, Sorsogon Provincial Library.

1908-09

Mario Guariña

1910-12

Mario Guariña[7]

1913-16

Victor Eco[8]

1917-19[9]

Jose Zurbito

Governor Jose Figueroa. Image is via Facts About Sorsogon, Sorsogon Provincial Library.

Governor Jose Figueroa. Image is via Facts About Sorsogon, Sorsogon Provincial Library.

Governor Juan Reyes. Image via Facts About Sorsogon, Sorsogon Provincial Library.

Governor Juan Reyes. Image via Facts About Sorsogon, Sorsogon Provincial Library.

1920-22

Jose Figueroa[10]

1923-25

Bernabe Flores Palma 

1926-28

Pelagio Guamil

1929-31

Juan S. Reyes

Governor Bernabe Flores Palma. Image is via Facts About Sorsogon, Sorsogon Provincial Library.

Governor Bernabe Flores Palma. Image is via Facts About Sorsogon, Sorsogon Provincial Library.

1931-34

Governor Silverio Garcia. Image is via Facts About Sorsogon, Sorsogon Provincial Library.

Governor Silverio Garcia. Image is via Facts About Sorsogon, Sorsogon Provincial Library.

Silverio Garcia M.D.

1935-37

Teodisio R. Diño

1938-40

Teodisio R. Diño

1941-

Teodoro De Vera[11]

 1942-44

Governor Pelagio Guamil. Image via Facts About Sorsogon, Sorsogon Provincial Library.

Governor Pelagio Guamil. Image via Facts About Sorsogon, Sorsogon Provincial Library.

Silverio Garcia M.D.[12]

1945[13]

Vicente L. Peralta

The late Cong. Vicente Peralta.

The late Cong. Vicente Peralta. Source – Tina Peralta.

1946-47

Salvador Escudero Sr.[14]

1948-1951

Salvador Escudero Sr.

1952-55

Salvador Escudero Sr.

1956-59

Governor Salvador Escudero. Image via Facts About Sorsogon, Sorsogon Provincial Library.

Governor Salvador Escudero. Image via Facts About Sorsogon, Sorsogon Provincial Library.

Juan G. Frivaldo[15]

1960-63[16]

Juan G. Frivaldo

1964-67

Juan G. Frivaldo

———————————-

Footnotes:

[1] On October 17, 1894, Sorsogon separated from the province of Albay. Between Sorsogon and Casiguran, the latter was selected. All governors during the Spanish occupation were Spaniards.

[2] Page 7, Facts About Sorsogon, Province of Sorsogon; the said publication (which can be found on the Sorsogon Provincial Library) doesn’t contain the date it was published. But there’s a letter from the late Gov. Frivaldo and the list of governors stop at 1967.

[3] In some publications, his name is spelled as Alejandro. It was during his time that the Spanish occupation ceased. Forced to leave, he left his administration to the then Vicar Forane of Sorsogon, Rev. Fr. Jorge Barlin. Col. Amado Airan was appointed Gobernador Politico Militar for the province during the revolutionary period. His appointment as Sargento Mayor de la Plaza de Malolos para Sorsogon.

[4] A Doctor of Pharmacy.

[5] The Americans took over and appointed a certain Leviste as a military governor.

[6] Served 3, 2-year terms.

[7] Served a 3-year term.

[8] Served a 4-year term.

[9] Starting this period until the breakout of the war, the elected officials only served 3 years.

[10] Originally the 1st Board Member on 1913-16, under Gov. Eco. He was born in Bacon. He was well-known for his Spanish essays, but spent more time in writing in Bicol language.

[11] Gov. De Vera didn’t finish his term. While the provincial governor, he was elected as Congressman for the 2nd district of Sorsogon. Salvador Escudero, the ranking board member, replaced him as the provincial governor.

[12] An appointed governor by the Japanese Imperial Army. Meanwhile,  Gov. Escudero carried on with his post and at the same time led the resistance movement against the Japanese.

[13] All provincial officials were appointed during on 1945-47 period.

[14] Also known as Gurang.

[15] Also known as Tata Juan.

[16] From this term, a Vice-Governor has been included among the elective provincial officials. Three (3) board members – Restituta Rebueno, Arcadio De Vera, and Fernando Gerona – were also elected for the first time, instead of 2. The first Vice-Governor is Leopoldo Figueroa. The term of the elective officials after the war was 4 years.

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One Response to Sorsogon’s List of Governors – 1894 to 1967

  1. Frank DeLeon says:

    Hi Sorsogon City:
    Thanks for this historical information. That’s a lot of leg work, time-wise, on your part and I do appreciate it for I love to read about the old Sorsogon that has gone by.

    I was not aware that the late Cong. Peralta was an acting governor of the province. It is a pity that he died relatively young. He could have a brilliant career in politics. As with Billy Joel song … ” only the good die young.”

    Am also proud that my lolo served the longest term as governor, though Frivaldo could have topped him if he did not skip to the States when Marcos declared martial law in 1972.

    Thanks a million,
    Frank

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